Friday, November 30, 2012

David Stern was right to fine Popovich and the Spurs



Gregg Popovich made one of the most controversial coaching decisions when he decided to send Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili, and Danny Green home on a road game in Miami. Nobody is denying that. Where the debate comes in is David Stern’s decision to slap a $250,000 fine on the roster littered with Hall of Famers and NBA champions.

The popular position is to side with coach Gregg Popovich. He is responsible to the San Antonio Spurs for putting them in a place that best gives them a chance to win a championship. After all, that is the ultimate goal in sports.

Not only that, but Popovich has proven that he is more than capable of creating bona-fide championship managerial decisions. Resting Duncan and Ginobili—players well past their prime—is going to be part of the regular season. Players that are younger have been injured in less trying circumstances, namely Derrick Rose’s season-ending injury in the last minutes of what was a blowout win, so Popovich appears to be completely right in deciding to sit his stars.

More importantly, the San Antonio Spurs landed a terrible stretch of games by the NBA. Six away games in nine days is a bout of horrendously bad luck and should not have happened, especially when it involves trekking from Canada to Miami (among other stops, of course). The Heat, on the other hand, have played one game in the past week and it was against the Cavaliers.

So while the Heat fans did get the short end of the stick not being able to see some of the NBA’s best in action, Popovich’s decision was purely in the best interest of the organization. And the Spurs nearly won the game, too, so it’s not as if the Spurs gave the Heat a freebie. Taking it at its surface value, which Skip Bayless did in Friday’s episode of First Take, you might say that the amalgamation of these factors means that of course Gregg Popovich can rest his guys.

Initially, I was also infuriated that David Stern was going to drop the hammer on one of the NBA’s most respectable franchises. But, that initial overreaction probably had a lot to do with to the NFL saga that has gone on between the New Orleans Saints and commissioner Roger Goodell.

The reality is that David Stern was completely correct in deciding to fine the Spurs.

His words: “[The Spurs] did this without informing the Heat, the media, or the league office in a timely way. Under these circumstances, I have concluded that the Spurs did a disservice to the league and our fans."

Duncan, Parker, and Ginobili weren't even on the
 bench vs. Miami on Thursday.
Stern articulated the perfect reason for the fine. Never does he say that the fine is directly because of benching Duncan and Co., but rather it’s the lack of timely manner that led to the fine. That is precisely the problem. A personal analogy: as a fan, I have specifically chosen to watch games that had the best players on the field. Back in the early days of what is now AT&T Park in San Francisco, Barry Bonds was bashing home run after home run. I was ecstatic one day to see the Giants in action.

And while I love cheering on my home team, my left field seat shows an equally valid intention for paying the price of admission: I wanted to be entertained by (a juiced up) home run hitting machine.

But he sat out that game.

Here we are, more than a decade later, and I still remember that game. I don’t remember any of the results of the game, but I remember the fact that I missed the man who would hit 756 career home runs. I was disappointed much for the very same reasons that Heat fans were probably disappointed (even though they are spoiled themselves with LeBron James and Dwyane Wade…).

I had spent good money to watch a game—to be entertained—by some of the best professional athletes in the world. I gladly would have bought tickets to a different game to see Bonds play (but since it was a Giants home game, nobody cared, of course). The point is clear: the Spurs come to Miami once a year. But the fans would rather pay to see most other NBA teams play the Heat than the second-string Spurs team that comes once a year.

Even though he has the right to choose when to rest his players, the way he did it this time was not right. Popovich is obliged to put the Spurs organization in the best position to win; however, he also has a responsibility to the league and its fans to let them know when such prominent NBA (super)stars will sit out when its for a reason like scheduling.

The integrity of the NBA—and ultimately his paycheck—depend on it.

43 comments:

  1. I disagree with you point and arguments completely. Sports is about winning. Any Spurs fan would be fine letting their players sit knowing that it could help their ultimate goal--winning a championship. It's impossible to ask players to play every game (especially baseball, and in these circumstances with old players playing multiple games in a short timespan, basketball). If Buster Posey had played 162 games, how would that have worked out? He was healthy all year, and he sure was a slacker for only playing 140, right?

    It sucks for the fans who paid to see a game, but ultimately you go to a game to see two professional teams play, not the individuals who are actually in the lineup. Fans who watch sports for individuals probably would not have a vested interest in a team in the long term. To say that these players had to play because it is the reason fans show up defeats the purpose of sports in general. If you want to see amazing individual performances, go see the Harlem Globetrotters. Popovich has a responsibility to put his team in the best position to win a championship, not to please anyone. it is similar to the broken system regarding questionable statuses in football. Anything that the other team doesn't know is an advantage to your team. The Spurs nearly left Miami with a victory.

    Also, there is no way teams will announce everyday when or when not a player will play on a timely basis. Lineup cards change daily and even an hour before gametime, long after tickets were purchased. Popovich did not throw the game, the players did not throw the game, and no prior agreements were made. The fans saw professional athletes playing basketball at the highest level, even if three stars were not available. There is absolutely nothing wrong with Popovich's decision. Even if there was, Stern has no right to fine a team that kind of money for that decision. It is totally out of the realm of his power. And Stern's fine is hypocritical. Teams throw games consistently near the end of the season to get higher draft picks with no repercussions. The Spurs did not intentionally lose, but rather put themselves in position to be a fresher, healthier team over the course of the season. David Stern did a diservice to the NBA proving how hypocritical its operation truly is (this doesn't even consider that its setup not only allows, but encourages the destruction of parity and only 5 truly competitive teams to exist).
    It would suck to not see Duncan, Ginobili, and Parker play against elite competition (even though the Spurs still are a boring team), but Heat fans should rejoice for being given an easier victory and Spurs fans should appreciate the experienced foresight of their coach. The only people who can complain are owners who have to pay players to sit when healthy and tv networks who may televise a "less interesting" game. There are people that can be blamed for this happening (such as whoever constructs the NBA schedule and puts teams like the Spurs in this situation), but in no way did Popovich do anything wrong. David Stern is in the same league as Roger Godell, a commissioner on a power trip attempting to turn their professional sport into sheerly money making entertainment.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the comment. And I agree that sports are about winning. But there’s no
    winning if there’s no money to pay for it. Of course a Spurs fan would be okay
    letting their players sit out knowing the ultimate goal is to win a
    championship, that’s not my point. It was an away game that very few Spurs fans
    probably went to. I’m arguing for the Heat fans who wanted to see TD, Ginobili,
    and Parker and the integrity of the NBA.

    The Posey point is valid insofar as 162 games played would have worked out poorly.
    But Posey is known to need to sit out periodically and has played first quite
    frequently. He’s coming off a season-ending injury (last year) that no doubt
    requires special attention. And there was never a situation of the magnitude of
    this regular season game. Baseball is 9-on-9 plus relievers, etc. and the
    Giants have two Cy Young award winners, a guy who was hitting .340+ until
    caught etc still on the field. Pop sat the four current faces of his franchise.
    That’s comparable to Bochy sitting Posey, Sandoval, Crawford, Melky (when he
    was there, which was most of the regular season), Belt, Pence, etc… (4 out of 5
    compares to about 7 of 9).

    Of course there is no way that teams can announce players will play or not. But
    even Popovich himself said “If I was taking my 6-year-old son or daughter to
    the game, I’d want him or her to see everybody. And if they weren’t there, I’d
    be disappointed.” http://on.nba.com/RrRCrP

    The NBA schedule was known to Popovich months in advance. He could have easily told the
    league and its fans much earlier. That is the problem and what Stern made a
    statement about. And the problem is exactly what you said, Stern and Goodell
    are often rightfully portrayed as being on a power trip. But for this
    particular instance, Stern actually got it right.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for the comment. And I agree that sports are about winning. But there’s no winning if there’s no money to pay for it. Of course a Spurs fan would be okay letting their players sit out knowing the ultimate goal is to win a championship, that’s not my point. It was an away game that very few Spurs fans probably went to. I’m arguing for the Heat fans who wanted to see TD, Ginobili, and Parker and the integrity of the NBA.

    The Posey point is valid insofar as 162 games played would have worked out poorly. But Posey is known to need to sit out periodically and has played first quite frequently. He’s coming off a season-ending injury (last year) that no doubt requires special attention. And there was never a situation of the magnitude of this regular season game. Baseball is 9-on-9 plus relievers, etc. and the Giants have two Cy Young award winners, a guy who was hitting .340+ until caught etc still on the field. Pop sat the four current faces of his franchise. That’s comparable to Bochy sitting Posey, Sandoval, Crawford, Melky (when he was there, which was most of the regular season), Belt, Pence, etc… (4 out of 5 compares to about 7 of 9). Or maybe Girardi of the Yankees sitting A-Rod, Jeter, Cano, and others since the Giants stars until the World Series were relatively unknown.

    Of course there is no way that teams can announce players will play or not on a daily basis. But
    even Popovich himself said “If I was taking my 6-year-old son or daughter to the game, I’d want him or her to see everybody. And if they weren’t there, I’d be disappointed.” http://on.nba.com/RrRCrP

    The NBA schedule was known to Popovich months in advance. He could have easily told the
    league and its fans much earlier. That is the problem and what Stern made a statement about. And the problem is exactly what you said, Stern and Goodell are often rightfully portrayed as being on a power trip. But for this particular instance, Stern actually got it right.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Do you seriously think that Heat fans paid to see Duncan, Ginobli and Parker, three aging players who are perceived as playing a "boring" style of basketball? No - they came to see Lebron, Wade, Bosh and Allen dominate the show.

    I mean, I would understand the anger if the Lakers came to town and sat Kobe, Dwight, and Nash, but there's no way that Heat fans got the "short end of the stick" by not seeing the Spurs' three amigos.


    Stern was upset because it was a TNT game and the whole country tuned in to see the Heat play the Spurs' JV team.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I don't think the majority of Heat fans did pay to see the Big Three in SAS but I still think that it sends a message to other teams that it's okay (see my response to no way's comment). This is for the exact point that you mentioned, if the league is okay with this decision then it's saying the hypothetical Lakers situation you brought up is okay. What if it Pop was coaching the Lakers instead of the Spurs and he made the same decision to sit Kobe and Co.? There would be an outrage from Miami or whoever got the raw end of the deal.


    Also, the quote I cited from Pop himself in the other comment nicely adds to this point.

    ReplyDelete
  6. As a fan, wouldn't you rather see your team play in the playoffs than watch them play a meaningless regular season game? In Popovich's judgement, sitting those four is good for the Spurs in the long run--meaning it's more likely a Spurs' fan will get to watch their team in the playoffs.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Definitely, as a fan of your own team that's completely reasonable. But again, the point is that it's the other teams that are getting the raw end of the deal (see other comments).

    ReplyDelete
  8. Last thing. You're personal experience stated how you wish Bonds played at the game you went to, but he didn't because he was old and needed rest. That would have worked out poorly as well. But that's sports.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sadly you are wrong. Coaches can DNP any of their players for whatever reason they want, they dont need to consult the fans beforehand. Iverson skips a practice? Coaches can DNP him. Players brings a gun into locker room? Coaches can DNP them. They dont even need to tell you why.

    In this case, Pop decides that their core players are old and banged up and need rest. How many months beforehand does he need to inform you? If you dont like them as a fan dont go to their games. They obviously care more about their players' health than just pleasing fans that actually want to see LeBron.

    What annoys me is that some fans think that just because they bought a ticket, they are entitled to whatever they want. If i was a spurs fan I tell you what I want, I want the key players to be healthy during playoffs. Same applies if i was a heat fan. Say if the heat decides to rest their players when i bought a ticket to the game would i have a problem with that? No way. Would I be disappointed? Of course. But I dont run the team.

    To make the point more moot, the heat spurs game was a fantastic game. I enjoyed the game very much even tho the stars from the spurs werent playing. It was just good basketball

    ReplyDelete
  10. Of course coaches can do whatever they want. Who's arguing a gun possession isn't enough? Skipping practice? No doubt that those earns a DNPs.


    It doesn't have to be months. A week or two weeks is more than reasonable - even a couple of days! As the article states and I have said multiple times in comments, it's not the fact that Pop rested them. It's the way he did it, almost as if to spite the league. And by doing so, it was unfair to fans. It sets a precedent that the NBA should discourage which they have done.


    Sadly the fact that the game was fantastic does not matter in this case. It's the principle of the matter that causes problems. It was a good basketball game because Pop is a great coach and the Heat took the game for granted...Pop's a great coach who made a decision that rightfully cost his team a quarter million dollars.

    ReplyDelete
  11. You're assuming he knew he was going to sit them far in advance by looking at the schedule. The decision probably came only as he gained information on the conditions of his players during the road trip, and they did play a night game the day before, so it couldn't have possibly have come sooner than the early morning hours of Thursday.

    And, it's fully reasonable for Popovich to want to see how they're doing after a night's sleep before deciding to rest them, which he decided in the morning.

    And... you're demanding a 1-2 week's notice? That could be before the road trip even started! With this expectation, you're making it impossible for a coach to use real-time, or even reasonably recent, information in such a decision.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Actually, I was saying that "It doesn't have to be months. A week or two weeks is more than reasonable - even a couple of days!" I have a hard time believing that he didn't know well in advance of his announcement. It was a grueling road trip and I have a feeling that Popovich was smart enough to look in advance at the entire road trip. In certain cases, real-time and reasonably recent info are a part of a decision but this one was not. It was based on horrendous luck scheduling which is why I have no problem that he benched his guys. It's the way he did it that I think deserves the fine.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Funny thing is the Spurs actually sat their Big Three against the Warriors in Oakland late last season. In fact, Pop didn't even travel to Oakland. The Warriors were trying to tank to get a better draft pick and the Spurs wanted to rest their starters similar to what they did against the Heat. But there were no fines whatsoever by the NBA.
    Going off of that point, if Stern was right to fine the Spurs, then the NBA should have fined the Warriors millions of dollars last season for tanking to get a better draft pick.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I see the point that you're making but I'd say that tanking has been a part of the NBA, NFL, and to a smaller degree, the MLB for a while. So a fine there would be outrageous.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Well isn't tanking a "disservice to the league and its fans" by deliberately losing games? The Spurs were actually trying to win the game against the Heat and got fined, so why not fine the teams that don't try to win?
    It's too bad the Spurs lost - I wanted to see Dictator Stern fine them for winning a game.
    I respect your opinion, but I just don't see how anyone can agree with Stern's decision. It's downright ridiculous!

    ReplyDelete
  16. http://nba.si.com/2012/12/02/mavericks-cuban-agrees-with-sterns-fine-of-spurs/



    Apparently I'm not the only one who agrees with Stern.

    ReplyDelete
  17. And on the subject of tanking, it's completely different. Generally when teams do that they give shots to younger players that haven't gotten opportunities which is a completely reasonable thing to do because obviously the regular starters couldn't get it done. As an example, it's like Tebow coming in for Sanchez or Pryor for Palmer. Sanchez and Palmer are both starters (even though Sanchez shouldn't be) and a change in leadership and player personnel is occasionally necessary.

    ReplyDelete
  18. From a business standpoint, yes I can understand why Stern would be pissed. It is his job to market and grow the NBA, and the Spurs resting their stars on a TNT game definitely does not help.
    But it is Pop's job to coach his team, not to market and grow the NBA. He did the best possible thing his team (btw, the Spurs beat the Grizzlies their next game w/ the big three), and it's ridiculous that he has to be fined for that.
    Personally, I think it's just another example of Stern hating on the Spurs, but that's another story.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Well in that case Pop should be okay with the fine, as Cuban says he would be if in a similar situation. Like you said, it's Pop's job to coach his team. It's Stern's job to market the NBA. So you think that Pop can do his job but Stern can't do his?

    ReplyDelete
  20. How does fining a team for resting players help market and grow the league? If anything, it shoes how controlling Stern can be (think Chris Paul to Lakers trade). If he doesn't like something, he'll use his power to force them to work in his favor. And that is not the way for anyone to do their job.
    We wouldn't be talking about this if Adam Silver was commissioner, but instead we're stuck with Stern until 2014.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I believe that $250,000 fine was justified due to the "totality" of the circumstances, which includes (but are not limited to): Popovich knowing the year-long schedule; not stating to Miami, NBA fans, and the league - within a "reasonable time" ( e.g. a day or two before the game) - that his three key players and Danny Green will not be playing against the Heat. Ultimately, Popovich did a disservice to the NBA league - especially to the great NBA fans who paid several hundreds of dollars for those tickets - for not informing the proper people or agencies about the Big 3 being sent home. However, if Popovich did notify the league,NBA fans, and the Heat a day or two before the game then I would have to fully support Popovich decision: resting his key/start players.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Appreciate the comment and you hit on pretty much all of my main points. Thanks for the comment and it's good to see someone who agrees with the article... haha

    ReplyDelete
  23. Dude, who are you? I own five companies... what do you own? A small room without a closet?

    ReplyDelete
  24. Love the points, completely and utterly disagree with the conclusion.


    Here's my two cents: Although you make some really good points, at the end of the day, Pop is the coach of the team and and he has a right to make his decisions regarding players without getting his team a fine. Superstars have been benched before for other reasons (ie: missing practice, etc) with less than an hour's notice. Additionally, many NBA teams rest their stars before playoff time. The Spurs have done this, as have the Lakers (last year with Kobe!), and other teams such as the Boston Celtics (with their aging trio last year). I doubt that in those situations, Pop, Rivers, and Mike Brown told David Stern days in advance: "these are the days when we are resting our players, don't put these games on national TV", even though resting players is a commonly employed strategy (so, sure, those games tend to not be on national TV). I remember that Kobe was sat during the last regular season game last year versus the Kings at the last minute.


    To me, this just sets a double standard! Coaches can rest players before a normal regular season game, just not a national TV one? Really? The teams don't pick and choose what games they decide to play on national TV, the league office does! If Pop had sat his players on the previous day, during the game versus the Orlando Magic, I'm almost certain that the Spurs wouldn't have been fined. I know it is Stern's job to market the NBA, but it isn't right to expect coaches to change their strategies just because a game happens to be on TNT.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Pop is the coach of the team and has a right to make managerial decisions. But when situations like this arise it isn't fair to the news networks and the fans. Ultimately, there would be no NBA without revenue! Do you think the NBA would be anywhere near where it's at without players like MJ, Kobe, LeBron, etc. broadcasted for the nation to see? (Answer: no.)

    Now, about this "double standard": it's not a double standard, it's the "unwritten rules" in the NBA. I've mentioned that scheduling is the main problem that Pop had with the NBA - and rightfully so! But he knew the schedule WELL in advance of the game and easily could have let them know days (if not weeks) in advance. It's not at all like an end of season resting thing. It's resting for aging BECAUSE the Spurs got the raw end of the deal - but they knew in advance that it was a terrible streak of road games. They had every right to make a statement but the way that they did it was as bad as the scheduling.

    Taking the words of the outspoken Mark Cuban: "TV is our biggest customer. So I’m not saying San Antonio did the wrong thing. I’m just saying I understand exactly why the league did what they did....I tried to find every angle not to [side with Stern], but I do know who pays our bills,” Cuban said. “That is the driver for all things financial in sports — period, end of story. And when you [mess] with the money train you get [fined].”

    Also: "The NBA’s current deal with ABC, ESPN, TNT and NBA TV, which includes digital rights, pays the league a total of $7.44 billion from the 2008-09 season through the 20015-16 season. The next deal will be for at least an average of $1.2 billion a season."

    ReplyDelete
  26. Sure, the NBA would not be where it is today without its stars broadcast on TV. But at the end of the day, this won't happen often, as these players are stars for a reason - they give the team the best chance to win on most occasions. But resting players is a part of basketball, and as a coach, your job is to find a way to win. As you said yourself, Gregg Popovich knows how to win. And if you say it's all about the money, then why do you suggest that if Pop had told the league a few days in advance that his stars would be sitting, the team shouldn't be fined? I'm pretty sure the TNT game would still be broadcast as planned. Would Stern be right to fine the Spurs in that case??

    Additonally, how can you fine somebody for an unwritten rule? Let alone fining $250k for it? That's completely ridiculous to me. I mean, I guess Stern CAN fine him for it, but it isn't the right way to send a message when the "unwritten rule" is hazy in nature (considering players can be sat for missing practices, injury, etc, etc)

    ReplyDelete
  27. Again, it's the WAY he rested his players. He did it to make a statement to Stern and the NBA rather than purely for strategic reasons. Stern has not fined teams for resting players in countless other situations which proves that it's more than simply "fining a team for resting players."


    And I don't think anybody believes that $250,000 will really do much in the grand scheme of things. These organizations make millions, the TV deals are worth billions, and $250,000 is to the Spurs what pennies are to your average adult.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I'm pretty sure that the game could have easily been changed, for one. Second, I meant unwritten rules in the sense that teams are okay resting old players particularly at the end of a regular season but generally not during the midst of the season...or in this case very early in the season. It's Spurs vs. Heat, two of the best teams in basketball. If that isn't what people who don't have local teams to root for want to watch, I don't know what is.


    And like I mentioned in my other comment today, $250,000 is to the Spurs what pennies are to your average person. It's a slap on the wrist. And it is a reminder to be respectful of the people that pay the bills. All of this "control freak" Stern is overblown here. Truthfully what does $250K mean to the Spurs considering they pay players exponentially larger sums of money?


    The importance of the move is that it brings awareness to the issue and warns the rest of the league (and its fans like those of us writing, reading, and commenting on this issue).

    ReplyDelete
  29. Still. I guess we agree to disagree. I just don't like the idea that coaches need to change their strategies (and proven, winning, strategies!) based on national TV schedules that are completely out of the coaches' control, and largely the organizations' control as well. I'm sure if it was up to Pop he wouldn't care to play a game on national TV aside from the playoffs, haha.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Fair enough - I can definitely understand your perspective, I just disagree with it. Good dialogue though and glad you enjoyed the column.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Let me ask you this: if the Spurs were playing the Wizards on the road, second game of a back-to-back in front of 5,000 fans, and the game wasn't nationally televised - would Stern still have fined Popovich?

    ReplyDelete
  32. No he would not have. But like the article says: "Even though he has the right to choose when to rest his players, the way he did it this time was not right. Popovich...has a responsibility to the league and its fans to let them know when such prominent NBA (super)stars will sit out when its for a reason like scheduling."


    And again, like Cuban said, for Stern it is about the money. We're talking billions of dollars here in TV deals. Games like Spurs vs Heat and tonights game (Lakers vs OKC) are what brings in the big cash for the NBA.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Hello to every body, it's my first visit of this website; this website includes awesome and genuinely excellent material in support of visitors.
    my web page > internet Marketing hong kong

    ReplyDelete
  34. Everything is very open with a very clear description of the issues.
    It was really informative. Your website is very useful.
    Thank you for sharing!

    Feel free to visit my web-site - water wastage

    ReplyDelete
  35. Yes! Finally something about hotel deals.

    Here is my blog post: http://sozialeswiki.de

    ReplyDelete
  36. Way cool! Some very valid points! I appreciate you penning this article plus
    the rest of the website is also very good.

    Feel free to surf to my web page ... Cheap Online business
    My site :: astrophysics.gsfc.nasa.gov

    ReplyDelete
  37. Hello there! I know this is kinda off topic but I was wondering if you knew where I could find a captcha plugin for
    my comment form? I'm using the same blog platform as yours and I'm having problems finding one?

    Thanks a lot!

    Check out my blog post; Http://www.american-ss.net/facial-fat-loss/outdoor-clothing-why-buy-From-Online-stores/

    ReplyDelete
  38. Hello! This is my first comment here so I just wanted to give a quick shout out and say I genuinely enjoy reading through your
    posts. Can you suggest any other blogs/websites/forums that go over the same topics?
    Many thanks!

    Also visit my weblog; Cheap Jerseys

    ReplyDelete
  39. Have you ever considered writing an e-book or guest authoring on other blogs?
    I have a blog centered on the same ideas you discuss and would really like
    to have you share some stories/information. I know my readers
    would enjoy your work. If you're even remotely interested, feel free to send me an e mail.

    My blog Michael Kors Outlet

    ReplyDelete
  40. When someone writes an post he/she retains the image of a
    user in his/her mind that how a user can be aware of it.

    So that's why this paragraph is outstdanding. Thanks!

    Also visit my site: Tory Burch Flats

    ReplyDelete
  41. Do you mind if I quote a couple of your posts
    as long as I provide credit and sources back to your blog?
    My website is in the exact same area of interest as
    yours and my visitors would truly benefit from a lot of
    the information you provide here. Please let me know if this alright with you.
    Thanks a lot!

    Take a look at my homepage: sell beats to artist

    ReplyDelete
  42. You ought to take part in a contest for one of the most useful
    websites on the internet. I most certainly will highly
    recommend this site!

    Review my web site; Michael Kors Outlet

    ReplyDelete
  43. Great beat ! I would like to apprentice at the same time as you amend your website, how could i subscribe for a blog website?
    The account aided me a appropriate deal. I were tiny bit familiar of this your broadcast provided brilliant clear idea

    my blog post: Sac Guess

    ReplyDelete

Add your thoughts or opinion.